Mar 312016
 

Recently my friend Roger Knights sent me a link to his review of a product called “cord cuffs” on the website Cool Tools. This reminded me that I had also purchased some plastic “cord cuffs” some years ago, but I never found a use for them. Instead I’d come up with my own method of securing extension cords.

First off, most people wrap their extension cords incorrectly. The proper way to gather line is NOT to simply gather it together in overlapping loops. This TWISTS the line. A quick Google search of the terms “how to coil a rope” yields a number of valid ways to coil a rope. But since an extension cord is almost certainly going to be less supple than any rope, I’ve chosen a very basic way of coiling for myself, which is seen here. Simply alternate loops with half-hitches. A loop imparts a small twist in one direction, while the half hitch imparts a similar small twist, but in the other direction, thus balancing out the twists in the line. The final bundle is roughly circular, which avoids bending or kinking the copper conductors inside. An excellent written account coupled with a video on the Lifehacker website demonstrates this method.

Overview Crop

First create a closed loop with a short length of strong line such as parachute cord. Instead of attaching the free ends with a knot, I’ve chosen to use an electrical butt connector, and to cover it with heat shrink tubing. A knot would be excessively bulbous in this situation. A butt connector is undoubtedly less strong than a knot, but in this situation the line is not supporting much weight.

Close Up One

I’ve chosen to attach the loop near the male end of the cord, but it would work just as well at the female end. Since the male end is either plugged into a receptacle, or attached to another extension cord, attachment at the male end avoids any interference with the device that the extension cord is plugged into. The loop is affixed to the extension cord with two small zip ties, which also help to offset the intrinsic weakness of the butt connector.

Close Up Two

An advantage of this method is that the final coiled extension cord can be suspended from a small peg or hook.

Suspended Cord

 Posted by on 03/31/2016 Art, Science Tagged with:  Comments Off on Extension Cord Storage